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A Time and a Place Audiobook Half Price Sale

A Time and a Place

Yes, I know it’s gauche to attempt to sell your wares, really wares should be capable of selling themselves, that would be best for everyone, certainly much less embarrassing for all involved.

Alas, it doesn’t work that way. You have to tell people about your wares, otherwise nobody will know about them. It’s not like we’re all telepaths (and those of us that are telepaths aren’t talking).

And so it is that I have no choice but to inform the fourteen of you who have not yet purchased a copy of A Time and a Place about this little opportunity to pick up the audiobook version at a bargain basement price.

Yes, you read that right, A Time and a Place is on sale at half price for the next couple of weeks (via Findaway Voices, which distributes to most major online retailers). (This does not include Amazon, which invariably does its own thing).

A Time and a Place (you might recall) is a science fiction time travel novel that has been described thusly:

“A brilliant, often hilarious, thoughtful and amazing read.”

Leesa Tea, Goodreads

Thank you Leesa. I did not pay Leesa to write that. I feel I owe her something for writing that beyond a simple thank you. If she ever writes a book of her own you can bet I will purchase, read, and praise it (no matter how terrible it is, which it won’t be, because let’s face it, this is obviously a woman with impeccable taste).

Okay. So what is this half-price audiobook about? So glad you asked:

When hapless English teacher Barnabus J. Wildebear’s nephew Ridley is kidnapped to help fight a war halfway across the galaxy, Wildebear rolls up his sleeves and sets out to rescue the boy. He soon finds himself in way over his head: who knew there’d be time travelling, shape changing, and battling an evil Necronian named Jacques? Making matters worse, the boy doesn’t even want to be saved. But none of that matters. Cuz rescuing your nephew from a sinister shape-changing alien in the middle of an intergalactic war is just what any good uncle would do. Isn’t it?

Well, that’s part of what it’s about, anyway. You’ll simply have to read it (or listen to it) to get the rest. Hey, it’s only about eleven hours of your time. The average person lives about 692,040 hours, so it’s not like that’s asking a whole lot. Is it?

So there you have it, A Time and a Place the audiobook version on sale at half price for the next couple of weeks.

Thank you for your time.

How to Make an Audiobook

How to make a Soufflé. I mean, an audiobook.

Et voila.

How to make an audiobook.

A version of this roughly half hour presentation was originally delivered to The Creative Academy for Writers. Why? Because my esteemed brother-in-law, Brian Wyvill (author of the highly entertaining time travel/seafaring novel The Second Gate), asked me to whip this up. And who can say no to Brian? I mean other than his wife, my sister Shawna. Well, plenty of people, maybe. But not me, he’s just too charming, so I created this, and presented it to the academy. And then I thought, why not just make it available to everyone?

So here it is.

Make of it what you will.

Now look. I don’t pretend to be the last word in creating audiobooks. This is just some general advice based on my experience as a sound guy and someone who’s recently turned a novel and a bunch of short stories into audiobooks. My goal is simply to provide a practical overview of how to make an audiobook, based on my experience.

I talk about the equipment you need, the preparation required, how to record your audiobook, a bit about editing and mastering your audiobook, and a bit about what distributors like Audible are looking for in terms of quality control.

Here’s hoping it’s of some help.

Hardcover of A Time and a Place Now Available!

A Time and a Place is now available in Hardcover

Just in time for Christmas!

The hardcover edition of A Time and a Place is now available.

Featuring an updated cover by Nathan Caro Fréchette (based on the original by Jeff Minkevics) this 6 x 9 jacketed case laminate edition also features a gloss cover finish, slightly updated text, and a full index.

It’s available in several marketplaces online, but for the moment is featured best at Barnes & Noble. (Update: it’s now up on Amazon as well.)

The softcover edition is also available from Barnes & Noble and other online retailers.

And the ebook and audiobook editions are still out there as well. Happy reading!

Free! A Time and a Place AudioBook

A typical waveform from the recording of A Time and a Place.

The week of September 13th is shaping up to be a big week for A Time and a Place. That’s when it will be featured as a BookBub Featured Deal. It’s also going to be featured in several other newsletters that week, and I’ll be the Manybooks Author of the Day on Sept 11th, just before the big promotion.

I thought this would be a good time to give away a few free copies of the well-received audiobook version of A Time and a Place.

At the moment I can offer the free version to readers and listeners in the US and Great Britain (sorry fellow Canadians! perhaps later).

If you would like a free version of the Audible version of A Time and a Place, simply email me at [email protected], tell me where you live, and I’ll send you your promo code. All I ask in return is an honest review on Audible once you’ve finished.

I look forward to hearing from you. Happy listening!

Burning Eyes lay down. But instead of going to sleep, he glanced up at Sweep. “I’ve been thinking about what you said.”

“What?”

“About going to Burning Eyes. Do you still think it’s stupid?”

Embarrassed, Sweep didn’t say anything.

“I know why I’m still alive,” Half Ear said.

“Why?”

“Because I’m going to save our people. When I was young I didn’t believe in Burning Eyes. I thought the whole idea of offering up sacrifices to him in return for services that never happened was silly. So the last time I brought him an offering on behalf of the family I waited. I hid and waited a long time because I wanted to see what if anything took the offering.”

Sweep didn’t say anything. She was learning to be quiet, like a grown-up T’Klee. But Half Ear didn’t go on, and Sweep was not grown up, not yet.

“What took the offering?” she asked finally.

“Burning Eyes took the offering.”

Sweep drew a sharp breath. “You saw him? What did he look like?”

“Terrible. And beautiful. He stood on his hind legs, and he was naked—didn’t have a lick of fur on him anywhere. He shone like polished stone. And his eyes were just like everyone’s always said. You know how when a fire’s dying and you’ve got those embers that keep on glowing? They burned like that.”

Sweep could see it clearly in her mind’s eye. I could too.

“What did you do?” she asked. “When you saw him.”

“I followed him. All the way up Kimay. He never knew I was there. I saw where he lives and I can find it again. That’s the reason I’m still alive. So I can save our people.”

Sweep could accept that. If anybody could save their people it was Half Ear. “What about me?”

Sweep felt herself withering under Half Ear’s gaze, but she didn’t look away for fear of missing what he might say.

“I can’t tell you why you’re still alive,” he said. “You need to decide that for yourself.”

Moments later Sweep and I watched as Half Ear’s back rose and fell rhythmically. She lay close to him, still and frightened, with no idea why she was still alive.

Excerpt From Chapter Ten of A Time and a Place

A Time and a Place Stats

People often ask me how the writing’s going. I interpret the question pretty broadly. As in, how’s the new writing going? Fairly well, thanks.

And: how’s my first novel doing?

There’s no short answer to that question. At least, no short accurate answer.

A Time and a Place has been available just over two years now. I usually tell people that I’m not quite in Stephen King territory yet but it’s going reasonably well, and that my excellent publisher tells me that the book has paid for itself, which I hope leaves the impression that it’s achieved some measure of success.

Whether the book truly can be considered successful depends on who you’re asking, I think. I suspect that any big-time publisher might condemn the book as a complete and utter failure. Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code sold eighty million copies. Compared to that, A Time and a Place has not exactly taken the world by storm.  

The aforementioned big-time publisher might—I say might—concede that the critical reception for A Time and a Place (professional and otherwise) has been reasonably favourable, but they would probably also feel compelled to point out the rather small sample size.

Some novelists, I suspect, might suggest that merely completing and publishing a novel constitutes success because doing so is goddamned hard. While I accept that, most novelists would also admit that that’s not enough. Almost all of us (if we’re being honest with ourselves) would admit that we define real success as massive book sales and wide critical acclaim. On those scores, A Time and a Place can not exactly be considered an unmitigated success.

Still, to be fair (especially to those who helped me with the book), it’s probably performing perfectly fine considering it’s a first novel by an unknown author published by an independent press. I assume all responsibility for any lack of greater success. And I am well aware that the freakish success of an author like Dan Brown is pretty much a complete fluke.

But I’ll let you be the judge. Here are the facts. Let’s start with sales.

As of my most recent Royalty statement, for the first quarter of this year, covering up to March 31st 2019, A Time and a Place has sold a total of 454 books.

Of those, my publisher sold 333 print editions, 98 e-books, 1 e-library edition, and 22 audio books.

Of the 333 physical copies my publisher sold, I sold 134 of those myself after purchasing them from my publisher (at a discount). I gave away 13 books as gifts, another 2 were kinda gifts (I thought the people would pay but they never did), and 1 copy was stolen after a reading at a library (she picked it up off the table when I was across the room. I didn’t confront her. I dunno, maybe she thought it was free).  I have another 18 copies sitting in my basement to have available for readings and book fairs and so on.

I earn 50% of net on any e-books sold, 10% on print (possibly more if I sell them myself, depending how much I charge), 50% on e-library copies, and 50% on audio books. A Time and a Place has earned me a total of $5989.68 since July 2017 when it first came out. Factor in the cost of purchasing books at a discount from the publisher to resell, all the marketing and promotion I do to supplement what my publisher does, along with treating myself to attending one writer’s convention per year, and I’m not exactly getting rich. Actually, technically I’m in the red, if I’m honest about how much I’ve spent on writing related activities since I began all this.  

So yeah, I don’t think I could call A Time and a Place a huge success financially so far.

It’s fared better on the critical front. Reviews have been mostly positive.

On Goodreads, it has been rated 42 times, accompanied by 23 reviews. It currently averages 4.35 out of 5, consisting of twenty-four 5 star reviews, thirteen 4 star reviews, four 3 star reviews,  one 2 star review and one 1 star review. It’s been added to 100 bookshelves, including 45 To-Read shelves.

23 of those 45 ratings have been accompanied by reviews. The reviews range from positive: “Mahoney writes with a practised wit,” “I loved this mesmerising audiobook with its non stop action and adventure,” and “A brilliant, often hilarious, thoughtful and amazing read,” to not so positive: “The second half of the book got a bit muddled for me.” “I think that the author was a bit too ambitious,” and “one of the least likeable protagonists I’ve read in some time.” 

On Amazon.ca it has been reviewed four times. All of those have been 5 star reviews.

On Amazon.com it has been reviewed twelve times (one 3 star review, two 4 star reviews, and nine 5 star reviews).

On Amazon.co.uk, it has been reviewed two times (both 5 star reviews)

Barnes and Noble has two reviews, one 3 star and one 5 star.

On Library Thing it has garnered six reviews (two 5 star, two 4 star, one 3 star and one 2 star, averaging 3.57 stars).

There are a few other reviews out there as well, mostly positive, a couple less so, on blogs and Audible. Some are replicated on Goodreads.

Out of the approximately eighty people who have rated the book, I personally know, am related to, or have met (at least once) around twenty. The rest are complete strangers to me. Personally knowing or having met those who have rated the book has been no guarantee of a positive review; three acquaintances have given A Time and a Place three star reviews.  

A Time and a Place has also been reviewed professionally by Publishers Weekly, who gave it a largely positive review when it first came out employing such words as “skillfully,” “entertaining,” and “great” to describe the writing, but the reviewer also discouraged me from getting too fat a head by suggesting that “occasional segments… distract or feel a little overdone.”

The book is currently being carried in seventeen libraries around the world according to WorldCat, in libraries ranging from Austin, Texas to Madison, Wisconsin to Rangiora, New Zealand, and at least three Canadian libraries that I know of, possibly more (despite having only sold one e-library edition; most libraries appear to have purchased print editions).

Does any of this matter? Of course! Otherwise I wouldn’t have written about it.  🙂  Also, I just thought some folks, especially fellow writers just starting out, might find it interesting.

Does it REALLY matter?

Of course not.

But it sure is a great way to procrastinate.

One final thought. Here’s a great Ted Talk from Albert-László Barabási on how to increase your chances of success in any field, writing included.

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