Tag: Draft2Digital

The Deer Yard Status Three Weeks In

My sister Susan Rodgers and I published the Kindle edition of my father’s collection of short stories, The Deer Yard and Other Stories, on Dec 9th 2021, less than a month ago. The paperback edition came out the following day. We also distributed an ebook edition via Draft2Digital to a whole range of other distributors such as KoboBarnes & Noble, and so on. A couple of weeks later another we published another softcover edition via IngramSpark.

We published it using my own imprint, Donovan Street Press, in association with my sister Susan Rodger’s company, Bluemountain Entertainment. Because Dad is an author from Prince Edward Island, and Susan’s company is also based in PEI, we are hoping to use grant money from PEI for this purpose, though that has yet to be confirmed. If that doesn’t pan out, the entire enterprise will be financed by me, which is perfectly fine, and the least I can for Dad, who has certainly done much more for me during my life.

Dad is eighty-seven years old and has been writing stories like those included in The Deer Yard his entire adult life. He’s had lots of time to perfect the tales. Editing them was mostly a question of correcting grammar and punctuation (as he put it, he spent his career teaching physics, not English grammar). He did have a penchant for writing in the passive tense that I took the liberty to address. Beyond that my ethos was just to make the stories shine, and change as little as possible. As I’ve mentioned elsewhere it felt very much like mining precious gems. I just needed to wipe the soil off and polish them up a bit.

We didn’t have a launch, virtual or otherwise. Dad wasn’t really interested in that. He just wanted to get the stories out there. We got the word out via Facebook to family and friends. There might have been a few texts, a few phone calls. An email to a writing group or two.

When you’re publishing a book you need to choose which categories it belongs to. Generally you start with a couple, though there are ways to get it into more categories. For The Deer Yard and Other Stories, I chose Short Stories and Family Life. Amazon determined it belonged to Canadian Short Stories. Niche categories like that are important because it’s easier to rank higher when there isn’t much competition. If you search Google for Hot New Canadian Fiction right now you’ll see that The Deer Yard ranks #38 and #39 for the Kindle and print versions. If you narrow it down to Hot New Releases in Canadian Short Stories you’ll see that it ranks #2 and #3, after sitting comfortably in the #1 and #2 positions for the last couple of weeks, beating out collections by such luminaries as Stuart McLean and Margaret Atwood. It is #8 in the Most Gifted category, having once or twice soared as high as #6.

You might think, gee, it must be selling thousands of copies to be ranked so high, and perhaps I should leave it at that. Smoke and mirrors. But that is not the reality of publishing, certainly not Indie publishing. The Deer Yard and Other Stories has achieved those ranks having sold fourteen ebooks and sixteen physical copies on Amazon, and an additional six ebooks on Kobo, for a total of thirty-six books and earning approximately $158 for Dad and a third of that for Amazon and Kobo. Still, that’s not bad for a book by an unknown author by an Indie publisher launched with zero fanfare and out less than a month.

Interestingly, Publisher Rocket (software that helps you analyze the competition and pick categories and keywords for your indie books) tells me that The Deer Yard and Other Stories has 15 competitors in its categories and is on track to earn $2602.00 this month. The former is probably close to the truth, but we are a long way off from earning the latter, I can tell you.   

In fact, the book will no doubt take a while to earn back the investment we put into it, even if the PEI government does come through with their grant. The Deer Yard and Other Stories cost just over $800 to put together. Here’s the breakdown:

Cover Design (all formats): $401.16

Cover Illustration: $100

Vellum (Publishing software, one time expense): $361.59

Total = $862.75

My daughter Erin drew the deer. I believe in paying people for their work which is why she got the $100, though she would have done it for free. The cover itself was designed by a professional, Valerie Bellamy, using Erin’s illustration. The publishing software, Vellum, went on sale days after I purchased it (d’oh!) so I could have saved some money there had I been smarter and more patient. Beyond that, it doesn’t cost anything to upload your book to Amazon and Draft2Digital. IngramSpark does charge a small fee, but I belong to The Alliance of Independent Authors who provide a promo code waiving that fee. 

So, just another $2444 in Royalties between now and end of day tomorrow and we’ll have lived up to Publisher Rocket’s rather optimistic projection. Something tells me we won’t quite make that. But I’m perfectly happy with where we’re at. The important thing was getting the book out there and a physical copy in Dad’s hands so he could hold his first book.

Everything else is gravy.  

BookBub Featured Deal Results (so far)

As promised, a brutally honest account of my BookBub Featured Deal.

It was quite the ride. I’m still not sure quite what to make of it.

Brief recap: A few weeks ago I applied for a BookBub Featured Deal for my novel A Time and a Place. This is a newsletter that goes out once a day to (in the case of science fiction) about 1.7 million people in India, Australia, Great Britain, Canada, and the United States. Statistically they figure that if you discount your book to, say, 99 cents for a few days around that time about 1900 of those 1.7 million people will buy your book (there are different packages involving different price points, including giving your book away for free). I gather BookBub gets about 200 submissions a day of authors trying to get their books into this newsletter, of which BookBub chooses one book. The books they choose are carefully curated; they only pick books they think will appeal to their audience.

So anyway, I applied for the science fiction package involving discounting my book to the painful price point of 99 cents, of which I would only receive 29 cents of each sale after Amazon and Draft2Digital take their cut (from Amazon, at least… BookBub would also direct potential readers to Kobo, Barnes & Noble, and Apple. They would have included Google Play but I didn’t have that set up yet; one of several mistakes I made during this promotion). The BookBub package itself cost $754 US. To my surprise, they accepted my book.

I was immediately suspicious.

At the time I had only the vaguest notion of what BookBub was all about. I quickly researched to determine whether this was a scam (um, if you can call a search on Google research). Cuz ideally the money flows to the writer, not the other way around. I quickly determined that, no, it wasn’t a scam. In fact, it’s considered one of (if not the) best ways to promote your book in the world of indie fiction. Many indie authors have taken advantage of it multiple times.

So I accepted their offer and the BookBub Featured Deal promotion was scheduled for Sept 13th, this past Sunday. My research suggested that a good way to optimize the promotion was to “stack” multiple promotions with other, more modest newsletters in the days leading up to and following the BookBub promotion. So I purchased additional promotions with Manybooks (Sept 11th, including an Author of the Day feature), Read Freely (Sept 12th), eBookSoda (also Sept 12th), The Fussy Librarian (Sept 23rd, the closest date they had available), and Reading Deals (a free service; never did figure what day, if ever, this ran). All of this cost $225.96 Canadian, on top of the $992.69 Canadian that the BookBub Featured deal cost, for a whopping total of $1218.65.

Hey, you only live once, and I wanted to give this a serious try.

So how did it work out?

It’s not quite done yet, as The Fussy Librarian promotion has yet to run, and the book is still featured on some of the newsletters’ websites, including BookBub. But this is where we’re at as of Thursday Sept 17th, four days after the BookBub newsletter went out.

I don’t get my sales results in real time because I’m mostly with Draft2Digital which only produces results the day after. Monday morning, the day after the Featured Deal ran, I woke up around 7am and saw that I’d sold about 300 books.

I was kinda bummed.

I checked again around 11am and that figure had jumped to 899.

I was less bummed.

Still, I had a ways to go to make up the cost of all that promotion. Over the next few days I watched as A Time and a Place clawed its way to number one on several platforms, garnering the coveted #1 bestseller tag on both the Canadian and Australian Amazon platforms in its category.

The coveted #1 Bestseller tag

I sold roughly 1200 copies within a span of 24 hours. I thought, wow, if this keeps up I should easily make my money back by the end of the week. BookBub is apparently well known for its “tail,” where books keep selling long after the promotion. Unfortunately, sales dipped precipitously the following day, and now sit at 1287 for Amazon, Kobo, B&N, and Apple. I’ve also sold one copy to Overdrive, four audiobook copies, and 4 copies of my collection of short stories, Other Times and Places. I do have books on other platforms, but they’re new there and I don’t anticipate any appreciable sales from those.

1019 of those sales were with Amazon.

92 were with Apple.

90 were with Barnes and Noble.

88 were with Kobo.

4 were with Audible.

And 1 was with Overdrive.

So far I have made $457.04 in Royalties, which puts me at a deficit of $761.61. So yeah, I’m probably not going to make my money back for some time.

Now, I know that some of this is my fault because I’m new at this and did a few things wrong. Really, the promotion was way premature because I only have one other book out, a collection of short stories. To make this work, I should have had at least two other books out in the same series, so that the promotion drove readers to those books at a higher price point. Also, I lost money because I had the book through Draft2Digital as opposed to direct with Amazon. And I should have had Google Play properly set up and ready to go. And I probably should have skipped those other newsletters (except the free one). Hey, I’m still learning.

Still, I don’t regret it (I’m good at rationalizing). It has put A Time and a Place in the hands of 1288 additional readers (and maybe one additional library). And I’ve learned a few things.

Most importantly, that I need to write more books.

A Time and a Place Update

Cover Art for A Time and a Place, by Jeff Minkevics A Time and a Place

A consequence of my publisher, Five Rivers Publishing, shutting down operations this year was that the novel I had published with them, A Time and a Place (which I will henceforth refer to as ATAAP in this post), was delisted from most book sellers. It therefore became imperative that I get it back out there lest it become well and truly out of print.

My experience with Five Rivers has been a uniformly positive one all the way through and this proved true at the end as well. I say Five Rivers but really I mean Lorina Stephens, the soul, essence, and driving force of Five Rivers. Lorina ensured that the transition of rights was as painless as possible, transforming all the rights for ATAAP back to me (and the rest of her authors) without any fuss or bother. The situation with Audible proved a little problematic for some of Lorina’s other authors as Audible was a bit of a stickler with third party producers involved, but it turned out to be easier for me as I was the sole performer and producer on the audiobook version of ATAAP. Three or four emails with Audible and we got that all sorted out.

Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Indigo and so on was a little more time consuming. I decided to release what turned out to be a second edition of ATAAP under my own publishing house, Donovan Street Press. I took the opportunity to scour the manuscript and eliminate about eight typos that had driven me crazy since the original publication. Even though I had gone over the manuscript umpteen times after we finished editing it back in 2017, I’d still managed to miss those eight. It is unbelievably difficult to catch every typo in a novel. Your eye scans right past them. Every time I read a book from one of the major publishers I delight in spotting typos as they make me feel better about mine. Typose exist in just about every book you will ever read (and if they don’t, I don’t want to hear about it).

Typos in the original version of ATAAP included (in no particular order):

  • P 186 the only way could think of (missing the “I”)
  • P180 passenger street (should be passenger seat)
  • P363 excess spaces in sentence 
  • P291 made a mess of it (should be make a mess of it) 
  • P289 eying (should be eyeing)
  • Diane Savident (should be Diana Savident) (this was rather embarrassing for me as Diana was a family friend)
  • P28: should be “the two of them vanished…” (Not the two of them had vanished)
  • P181 print version: should be Nissan Rogue (not Nissan Rouge) (invariably over the last three years I’d be out running errands and I’d find myself behind a Nissan Rogue, and I’d think of that typo. I’d grit my teeth and think, “I’m following a typo.”)
  • P375 “You’re here, where ever here is, allowing people to use you (to) wipe out entire civilizations” (missing “to”)

Rereading the manuscript, I was also horrified to discover a story glitch, a missing bit of narrative hand-holding regarding the nature of Sebastian. Probably not a big deal to the average reader, as Sebastian’s nature eventually becomes crystal clear, but it really needed to be made explicit early on. So this was an opportunity to correct that with the addition of a bit of extra dialogue in Chapter Five.

Finally, one reader had pointed out in private correspondence that I had exhibited a particular fondness for the word particularly. You will find far fewer instances of this word in the Second Edition of A Time and a Place (and in any future novels I write).

Despite the over abundance of the word particularly, ATAAP has managed to receive some pretty good reviews since its original publication in 2017. Releasing a second edition was an opportunity to include some of those reviews off the top of the book. I’m grateful to the following authors for their kind words in support of the book: Andrew Weston (author of the internationally bestselling IX series), A.B. Funkhauser (author of Shell Game: A Black Cat Novel), Brian Wyvill (author of The Second Gate), and comedian, actor and writer Matt Watts (Newsroom, Michael: Tuesdays and Thursdays).

All these updates required getting a new ISBN and hiring Eric Desmarais to produce a new layout (Eric had done an excellent job on the original layout). I’ve also contracted an updated cover from original cover artist Jeff Minkevics which I hope to make a part of ATAAP‘s Second Edition sometime in the next month or so.

Because it was important to get ATAAP back out there, I’ve already released the ebook and Kindle version on the sly through Draft2Digital. You will find it at every major online book retailer. Physical copies are still available but they will be second hand. I’m waiting to publish the second edition of A Time and a Place in physical form once I have the new cover in hand which, as I mentioned, will hopefully be in the next month or so.

I should also point out that the version of ATAAP up on Audible is the original version. Maybe I’ll update that version too one day, but to be honest I’m not in a rush to do so. Too many other important things to do, like finish my second novel, Captain’s Away. More on that later.

So, long story short, there’s a new, updated version of A Time and a Place out there, folks. Feel free to check it out.

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