Writer, Broadcaster

Tag: science fiction (Page 1 of 8)

Free! A Time and a Place AudioBook

A typical waveform from the recording of A Time and a Place.

The week of September 13th is shaping up to be a big week for A Time and a Place. That’s when it will be featured as a BookBub Featured Deal. It’s also going to be featured in several other newsletters that week, and I’ll be the Manybooks Author of the Day on Sept 11th, just before the big promotion.

I thought this would be a good time to give away a few free copies of the well-received audiobook version of A Time and a Place.

At the moment I can offer the free version to readers and listeners in the US and Great Britain (sorry fellow Canadians! perhaps later).

If you would like a free version of the Audible version of A Time and a Place, simply email me at [email protected], tell me where you live, and I’ll send you your promo code. All I ask in return is an honest review on Audible once you’ve finished.

I look forward to hearing from you. Happy listening!

Burning Eyes lay down. But instead of going to sleep, he glanced up at Sweep. “I’ve been thinking about what you said.”

“What?”

“About going to Burning Eyes. Do you still think it’s stupid?”

Embarrassed, Sweep didn’t say anything.

“I know why I’m still alive,” Half Ear said.

“Why?”

“Because I’m going to save our people. When I was young I didn’t believe in Burning Eyes. I thought the whole idea of offering up sacrifices to him in return for services that never happened was silly. So the last time I brought him an offering on behalf of the family I waited. I hid and waited a long time because I wanted to see what if anything took the offering.”

Sweep didn’t say anything. She was learning to be quiet, like a grown-up T’Klee. But Half Ear didn’t go on, and Sweep was not grown up, not yet.

“What took the offering?” she asked finally.

“Burning Eyes took the offering.”

Sweep drew a sharp breath. “You saw him? What did he look like?”

“Terrible. And beautiful. He stood on his hind legs, and he was naked—didn’t have a lick of fur on him anywhere. He shone like polished stone. And his eyes were just like everyone’s always said. You know how when a fire’s dying and you’ve got those embers that keep on glowing? They burned like that.”

Sweep could see it clearly in her mind’s eye. I could too.

“What did you do?” she asked. “When you saw him.”

“I followed him. All the way up Kimay. He never knew I was there. I saw where he lives and I can find it again. That’s the reason I’m still alive. So I can save our people.”

Sweep could accept that. If anybody could save their people it was Half Ear. “What about me?”

Sweep felt herself withering under Half Ear’s gaze, but she didn’t look away for fear of missing what he might say.

“I can’t tell you why you’re still alive,” he said. “You need to decide that for yourself.”

Moments later Sweep and I watched as Half Ear’s back rose and fell rhythmically. She lay close to him, still and frightened, with no idea why she was still alive.

Excerpt From Chapter Ten of A Time and a Place

Book for Sale

We interrupt this blog for the following not very important announcement!

Oh, how crass of me. But I have been remiss in promoting my wares.

(Now I can sleep soundly, knowing that I have done a bit of “ware promoting”. )

Other Times and Places now available increasingly everywhere!

About Other Times and Places:

What do a thief, wizards, a platypus, ghosts, soft drink salesmen, God, the devil, and a spaceman all have in common? Together they will make you laugh, think, sleep better, open your mind, spark your imagination, and quite possibly improve your complexion* as Joe Mahoney brings them all vividly to life in this humorous and thoughtful collection of seven tales of the fantastic.

*Individual results may vary

Other Times and Places

Seven Tales of Wonder…

My short little collection of seven stories of the fantastic, Other Times and Places, is now available at even more online retailers.

You can now pick it up online at Barnes & Noble, Rakuten Kobo, Tolino, and Vivlio. Soon, it will be available from Scribd, 24symbols, Overdrive, Bibliotheco, and Baker & Taylor. You can acquire Other Times and Places via any of these online retailers through this single universal link.

It will also be available through Amazon (it’s already there in print form), and an audiobook version is also in the works.


Other Times and Places:

What do a thief, wizards, a platypus, ghosts, soft drink salesmen, God, the devil, and a spaceman all have in common? Together they will make you laugh, think, sleep better, open your mind, spark your imagination, and quite possibly improve your complexion* as Joe Mahoney brings them all vividly to life in this humorous and thoughtful collection of seven tales of the fantastic.

*Individual results may vary

Reviews have been kind to my little short story collection:

It’s a lovely little collection of sci-fi and fantasy short stories, fun and well written.

Charles K, Amazon.com

Having read Joe Mahoney’s “A Time and a Place” and been suitably impressed with his artistry in story telling, I decided to check out Mahoney’s collection of short stories, “Other Times and Places.” I have not been disappointed. This little collection of stories is big on enjoyability. Highly recommended!

Frank Faulk, Amazon.com

This collection of short stories shows how far and wide Mahoney’s intricate mind can wander. Beautifully told in a slightly old world style.

Brian wyvill, Author of The Second Gate

T’Klee

Artist’s Rendition of a T’Klee

I know you’ve all wondered what an actual T’Klee looks like. You know, a T’Klee, from A Time and a Place.

What? You haven’t read A Time and a Place yet?

Well it’s not too late.

Or perhaps you’d rather listen to it.

Okay, now that you’ve read about T’Klee (or listened about T’Klee), that up there is one artist’s take on what a T’Klee actually looks like.

Thanks to my daughter Erin for sharing that with me. 🙂

A.E. van Vogt (1912-2000)

“…others write about the future…van Vogt writes from the future…”

Unknown, Mid-Twentieth century

 

A. E. van Vogt

Ah, it’s the missed opportunities that bug me most. Here’s another one.

I pitched the following to my friend and colleague Bill Lane, master dramatist, who joined forces with me to pitch it to the radio drama department. In this age of podcasting, I believe it remains a solid, valid pitch:


It’s hard to make a living writing fiction in this country.  It’s even harder to do it writing science fiction. Manitoba native Alfred Etan van Vogt did so and became one of the most respected SF writers of his day, on a par with Isaac Asimov and Robert Heinlein. His work remains enormously popular in the U.K., France, Brazil and Sweden, and yet few Canadians have ever heard of him.  We are lousy at celebrating our own.

And this is a Canadian whose work should be celebrated.  His work profoundly influenced the entire field of speculative fiction.  He once successfully sued the makers of the movie Alien for $50,000 US for ripping off his work. And without Van Vogt and his tales of the Space Beagle, there would have been no Star Trek. 

With typical Canadian modesty, he once described himself as “a bright but simple fellow from Canada.”  Others hold him in higher esteem.  He possesses, according to Charles Platt: “…a compelling presence, an intensity, a slightly mad gleam in his eye, and when he writes he comes up with eerie powerful journeys into symbolic depths of the psyche. When you open one of his novel you open the subconscious. He writes dreams.”

van Vogt… was not hard and cold and unemotional, in the manner of Clement, Asimov and Heinlein. He could balance his cubic light years and the paraphernalia of super science with moments of tenderness and pure loony joy.

Brian W. Aldiss

…van Vogt had…nothing less than the ability to deliver (a) total alienness within (b) a hugely panoramic background that (c) seemingly lacked reason and yet came together to (d) end by making total if terrifying sense.

Barry N. malzberg

Let’s wield what influence we possess to increase the Canadian public’s awareness of one of our own, a giant in his field, whose work deserves to be celebrated.


Slan

After many years of creating well regarded but relatively unlucrative short fiction, van Vogt turned his attention to the full-length novel.  His first, and by some accounts his most famous, was Slan.  Written while Vogt was living in Ottawa, Slan recounts the maturation of a mutant with telepathic powers and enhanced intelligence in a world hostile to his kind.

(It) was a paralleling of Ernest Thomson Seton‘s The Biography of a Grizzly: the pattern of Grizzly was: his mother is killed at the beginning, and the cub is on his own. He doesn’t find an old lady to help him, but he manages to find a place where he can hide for his first year or so. By then he is the equivalent of Jommy at nine — stronger than all the lesser animals of the forest; but he’d better stay away from full-grown black bears, etc. Finally, he comes to what Seton called in his heading: “The Days of His Strength.” He is a full-grown grizzly bear, king of the forest and mountains. For the most part I didn’t need parallels like that, but that one struck me as being interesting, and I used it automatically.

A.E. Van Vogt on his work Slan

Although a fun story with plenty of action, Slan is permeated with themes of fear, discrimination and alienation.  Eminently suitable for adaptation to radio, the opportunities for creative, exciting sound design abound.   

“Yes, I said ´mob´. That´s all people are these days. A mob, a beast we´ve helped build up with our propaganda. They´re afraid, mortally afraid for their babies, and we haven´t got a scientist who can think objectively on the matter. In fact, we haven´t got a scientist worthy of the name. What incentive is there for a human being to spend a lifetime in research when in his mind is the deadening knowledge that all the discoveries he can hope to make have long since been perfected by the slans? That they´re waiting out there somewhere in secret caves or written out on paper, ready for the day when the slans make their next attempt to take over the world?”

Excerpt from A.E. Van Vogt’s Slan
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